Three Ways to Build Social Proof

It seems as though everyone is talking about building brand trust and, for our team at Duo, building brand trust is best done via social proof. But what exactly is social proof?

Social proof is a term that has been around since 1984 and refers to people or in this case, customers, assuming that the actions of others are correct based on the frequency that they see these actions. So if you see ten of your friends buying from the exact same store over and over again, and that inspires you to shop there, that is social proof. 

But how do you build social proof? We shared our suggestions on the Sip, Create, Repeat podcast

Customer Reviews

Nothing is better for business than getting your customers talking about their experience via customer reviews. They can be obtained organically – via Google, Facebook or on your site itself – or perhaps they are incentive-based via an email campaign asking directly for reviews. For example, customers can review their most recent purchase for a chance to win a gift card. Whatever you do, try to keep those reviews regularly coming in in any way possible.

 

User Generated Content (UGC)

If you can inspire your audience to snap pictures of your offerings and post them organically to their social media channels (while tagging your account!), it can be a good way to build social proof. 

One thing our team does with any of the social media accounts that we manage is screenshot UGCs as they pop across our feeds – even when we are not “working” per se. We then repurpose it as Facebook ads or even organically in our social feeds to show followers others’ unbiased opinions.

 

Influencer Marketing 

Back in the day, marketers longed for celebrity endorsements of products and services. In today’s day and age, social media has introduced us to the concept of influencer marketing. 

As a marketer, you can utilize influencers, their audiences and their platforms to promote your products and services. The best influencers are finding ways to do this in an authentic way that connects with their audience. 

While influencers have to disclose (via FTC guidelines) they have received products or services in some sort of trade or paid way, they can still share content in a way that makes your offering seem just as though it was any other item they were purchasing for themselves – that they are just as excited for your product regardless of your relationship with them. Because of that, we really like taking time to find high quality influencers who also know how to really tell their story in an approachable way.

 

Enjoyed these tips? Tune in for future episodes of the Sip, Creative, Repeat podcast for more ways to help improve your marketing strategies!